Research Updates - War Related Illness and Injury Study Center
Attention A T users. To access the menus on this page please perform the following steps. 1. Please switch auto forms mode to off. 2. Hit enter to expand a main menu option (Health, Benefits, etc). 3. To enter and activate the submenu links, hit the down arrow. You will now be able to tab or arrow up or down through the submenu options to access/activate the submenu links.

War Related Illness and Injury Study Center

Menu
Menu

Quick Links

Veterans Crisis Line Badge
My healthevet badge
EBenefits Badge
 

Research Updates

American Public Health Association

Dr. Nisha Jani and colleagues had an abstract accepted for the American Public Health Association’s annual conference!

  • Association of Self-Reported Military Occupational Exposures and Chronic Respiratory Disease Among Participants in the Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry.

Click here to read the abstract.

Understanding Veterans’ Causal Attributions of Physical Symptoms

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Understanding Veterans’ Causal Attributions of Physical Symptoms

Suicide-related coping refers to strategies for adaptively managing suicidal urges and can be important an important factor for assessing risk and targeting intervention. The current study evaluated whether suicide-related coping predicted a suicidal event within 90-days, independently of other known risk factors. Veterans (N = 64) were evaluated shortly after a suicidal crisis and completed several assessments, including a measure of suicide-related coping. Multivariate analyses showed that suicide-related coping remained protective of a suicidal event (OR = 0.93; p = .047) after adjusting for suicidal ideation, previous suicide attempts, mood disorder, distress tolerance, and gender. Suicide-related coping may augment commonly assessed clinical factors in prediction of a suicidal event and is a suitable target for suicide prevention efforts.

Coping with Suicidal Urges: An Important Factor for Suicidal Risk Assessment and Intervention

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Coping with Suicidal Urges: An Important Factor for Suicidal Risk Assessment and Intervention

Suicide-related coping refers to strategies for adaptively managing suicidal urges and can be important an important factor for assessing risk and targeting intervention. The current study evaluated whether suicide-related coping predicted a suicidal event within 90-days, independently of other known risk factors. Veterans (N = 64) were evaluated shortly after a suicidal crisis and completed several assessments, including a measure of suicide-related coping. Multivariate analyses showed that suicide-related coping remained protective of a suicidal event (OR = 0.93; p = .047) after adjusting for suicidal ideation, previous suicide attempts, mood disorder, distress tolerance, and gender. Suicide-related coping may augment commonly assessed clinical factors in prediction of a suicidal event and is a suitable target for suicide prevention efforts.

Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Dietary Supplementation with Concord Grape Juice in Gulf War Veterans with Gulf War Illness

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Dietary Supplementation with Concord Grape Juice in Gulf War Veterans with Gulf War Illness

Approximately 30 percent of U.S. veterans deployed during the Gulf War (1990-1991) have been diagnosed with Gulf War Illness (GWI), a chronic multi-symptom disorder without widely available specific treatments. We investigated whether the consumption of Concord grape juice (CGJ), rich in anti-inflammatory flavonoids, would be tolerated and safe in individuals with GWI and explored improvement in cognitive function and fatigue. Thirty-six veterans with GWI enrolled in a 24-week randomized, double-blind, Phase I/IIA clinical trial to explore safety, tolerability, and feasibility of 16 ounces daily of commercially available CGJ compared to placebo. Participants completed neurocognitive tests and self-reported surveys at baseline, 12 and 24 weeks. Thirty-one participants (86%) completed the study; no dropouts were related to side effects. Thirty participants (83%) documented ≥80% adherence. There were no statistically significant unadjusted differences between CGJ and placebo groups in change in efficacy measures from baseline to endpoint. We employed general linear regression models controlling for baseline differences between groups which indicated statistically significant improvement in the Halstead Category Test-Russell Revised Version (RCAT) at endpoint in the CGJ group compared to placebo (8.4 points, p = 0.04). Other measures of cognitive functioning did not indicate significant improvements in the adjusted analyses (p-values: 0.09-0.32), nor did the fatigue variable (p = 0.67). CGJ was safe and well-tolerated by veterans with GWI. Our data suggest high tolerability and potential benefit from CGJ in veterans with GWI and can be used to inform future studies of efficacy.

Towards the objective assessment of suicidal states: Some neurocognitive deficits may be temporally related to suicide attempt

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Mental Health Conditions and Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions Among Veterans with Diabetes

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans with Deployment-Related Exposures

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Post-Exertional Malaise in Veterans with Gulf War Illness

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Doctor Recommendations are Related to Patient Interest and Use of Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Pain and Addiction

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Are Common Sense Model constructs and Self-Efficacy Simultaneously Correlated with Self-Management Behaviors and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Coping with Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms: The Role of Illness Beliefs and Behaviors

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Progression of Intervention-Focused Research for Gulf War Illness

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

Impact of presumed service-connected diagnosis on the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare utilization patterns of Vietnam-Theater Veterans

Click here for a graphical description of findings.

Click here to read.

 Disclaimer

*Links will take you outside of the Department of Veterans Affairs Website. VA does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of the linked websites.